• Posts tagged with conservation

    Lead Poisoning and a Love Triangle: A Tale of One Common Loon’s Brush with Death

    Lead Poisoning and a Love Triangle: A Tale of One Common Loon’s Brush with Death

    Nothing prepares you for your first close encounter with an injured loon. Thanks to countless individuals, this loon’s tale has a happy ending. However, its journey touched many, demonstrating that conservation on all scales requires a village of curious, passionate people.

    Building an Automated Moth Monitoring Network

    Building an Automated Moth Monitoring Network

    How are moth populations faring in Vermont? Except for a few species, no one really knows. A few years ago, VAL teamed up with community scientists, biologists, engineers, and computer scientists from around the world to change that. Now, we are poised to understand moths like never before.

    The Next Generation of Mt. Mansfield Ridgeline Research at VCE

    The Next Generation of Mt. Mansfield Ridgeline Research at VCE

    With all the buzz on bees and other pollinators lately, you may be wondering if VCE is still studying birds. Are we ever! Amongst the plethora of continuing and new research, our Bicknell’s Thrush research program is going strong and has expanded to explore additional questions and build on past discoveries.

    Forest Bird Monitoring Data Dashboard Goes Live

    Forest Bird Monitoring Data Dashboard Goes Live

    For over 30 years, VCE has coordinated the Vermont Forest Bird Monitoring Program to track the long-term population trends of interior forest birds. The backbone of this project is the dedicated corps of volunteer birders. The data these hardy birders collect are invaluable in tracking the status of forest songbirds. Now, the FBMP has a Data Dashboard where anyone can explore and interact with FBMP data and view up-to-date results.

    VCE is Abuzz with High-impact Bee Work

    VCE is Abuzz with High-impact Bee Work

    For over a decade, VCE has been positively buzzing with activity, surveying far and wide for bee species across the state. Our efforts kicked off with the Bumblebee Atlas in 2012 and reached a crescendo in 2022 with the State of Vermont’s Wild Bees report. Little did we know that this would start a multi-state ripple of pollinator work.

    VAL Director Provides Testimony on Proposed Neonicotinoid Ban

    VAL Director Provides Testimony on Proposed Neonicotinoid Ban

    On February 9, 2024, VCE Conservation Biologist and Vermont Atlas of Life Director Kent McFarland provided testimony to the Vermont State Agriculture, Food Resiliency & Forestry Committee on H.706, a bill requiring restrictions on neonicotinoids. What follows is the text from the written testimony.

    VPAtlas Places Statewide Vernal Pool Data at Your Fingertips

    VPAtlas Places Statewide Vernal Pool Data at Your Fingertips

    Conserving sensitive, vitally important ecosystems and natural communities, like vernal pools, is essential to addressing biodiversity loss. However, knowing vernal pools’ locations is a critical first step. The Vernal Pool Atlas (VPAtlas), a joint effort of the Vermont Center for Ecostudies and the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department, is designed to do just that.

    VCE Internship Supports the Future of Ecology

    VCE Internship Supports the Future of Ecology

    As an organization that strives to “unite people and science for conservation,” we recognize that to become stronger and more resilient, we must create a culture that embraces diversity and fosters inclusivity. With that goal in mind, VCE launched our Future Ecologists internship in 2022.

    Introducing VCE’s ALL IN for Biodiversity Campaign

    Introducing VCE’s ALL IN for Biodiversity Campaign

    When the VCE team developed a comprehensive organizational strategy in 2018, we charted an ambitious course, knowing that its success would require increasing our capacity. As we aspire to greater conservation impact, we’re going ALL IN for Biodiversity.

    Field Guide to January 2024

    Field Guide to January 2024

    Although the days are slowly growing longer, life in the Northeast still finds itself in the depths of winter. January is about survival. Wildlife that doesn’t migrate adapts instead to make it to spring. Here are a few tidbits of natural history happening outdoors this month around you.