• Posts tagged with Vermont Atlas of Life

    Loon Departure Times

    Loon Departure Times

    Those lucky enough to still be spending time on their favorite Vermont lakes may have noticed the disappearance of their resident adult loons, even with chicks still around. When do loons take to the skies? Read on to find out.

    Mallard ducks on a pond with colorful fall leaves in the background

    Field Guide to September 2020

    One morning, you wake to a nip in the air, and notice subtle changes in the quality of the light. Suddenly, it’s September. There’s a lot going on this time of year, if you know where to look. Here is your field guide to life on the move, and some natural history tidbits to discover this fall.

    Discover the Bees in Your Backyard this Spring

    Discover the Bees in Your Backyard this Spring

    Spencer Hardy, VCE’s Vermont Wild Bee Survey Project Coordinator, shares a video from the field, and how you can get involved in the Vermont Wild Bee Survey.

    Indian Pipe, also known as Ghost Pipe, sticks its pale, non-photosynthetic stalks and flowers up through the forest floor in late summer. / © K.P. McFarland

    Field Guide to August 2019

    We’ve still got plenty of summer here in Vermont and points north. In this edition of VCE’s monthly field guide to nature, we’ll celebrate a few audacious summer insects – but we’ll also alert you to animals on the move.

    Help Us Map and Identify Oak

    Help Us Map and Identify Oak

    Ready to participate in science? We have a job for you! Your mission is to record as many observations of oak trees (in the wild) throughout Vermont as possible in the Vermont Atlas of Life on iNaturalist. Together, we can create a basemap of oak distribution for comparison now and into the future.

    Move over Monarchs: VCE and Colleagues Reveal Astonishing Dragonfly Migration

    Move over Monarchs: VCE and Colleagues Reveal Astonishing Dragonfly Migration

    A recent study examines the chemistry locked in dragonfly wings to uncover the surprising annual migration of the Common Green Darner.

    When a Bluet Isn't Blue: Vermont's "Newest" Damselfly

    When a Bluet Isn’t Blue: Vermont’s “Newest” Damselfly

    Congratulations, Vermont. You’ve got a  new damselfly. Here’s a tale about a bluet that’s defies the “blue” in its name. It becomes Vermont’s 45th known damselfly species.

    2018 Peregrine Falcon Nesting Season Complete

    2018 Peregrine Falcon Nesting Season Complete

    The Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department recently announced that Peregrine Falcon nesting season has ended, so hikers and rock climbers can return to Vermont cliffs starting August 1, 2018.

    Results from the Vermont Atlas of Life

    Results from the Vermont Atlas of Life

    Never before has Vermont known more about the diversity of life within its borders. Yet never before have we needed…

    Bumble Bees in Peril

    Bumble Bees in Peril

    Unprecedented search by VCE reveals four species either extinct or declining More than one-quarter of Vermont’s bumble bee species, which…