• Glossy Ibis

    Common NameGlossy Ibis
    Scientific NamePlegadis falcinellus
    Type of ReportRare Species
    Date of Observation07/26/2017
    Number Observedone
    Reporting Observer's NameMaeve Kim
    Mailing AddressPO Box1086
    Jericho Center, VT 05465
    United States
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    EmailEmail hidden; Javascript is required.
    Date Completed07/29/2017
    Names & Emails of Other Contributing Observers

    Bernie Paquette

    Latitude of Observation44.2193078 N
    Longitude of Observation73.2576942 W
    Place NameLittle Otter Creek, Ferrisburgh
    TownshipFerrisburgh
    CountyChittenden
    Vermont eBird Checklist URLebird.org
    Time of Day11:25 AM
    Length of Time Observedapprox. 3 minutes
    Maximum Estimated Distance from Bird (in feet)100 feet
    Minimum Estimated Distance from Bird (in feet)30 feet
    Noteworthy Weather Conditions

    temperature in the low 70s - calm at this time, with breezes 3-5 mph from the SSW (wind increased later in the day) - visibility 10 miles according to Weather Underground - no precipitation -

    Optical Equipment Used for Observation

    Swift Audubon 8.5x44

    Observer’s Previous Acquaintance With This or Similar Species

    I've seen Glossy Ibis several times before, most recently this past May on Plum Island MA.

    I certify that that attachments included with this report were captured during this observation event​​.
    Description of Habitat

    wide river bordered by marshes (flowering rush, cattails, reeds) - We were enjoying one or two Great Egrets, a Caspian Tern, several Osprey and a pair of Belted Kingfishers at the time.

    Behaviors Observed

    The bird was flying.

    Description of Vocalizations

    none

    Verbal Narrative & Description of Observation

    We noticed a dark bird flying toward us, at a slight angle to our path, about twelve feet above the water. At first it looked like a Double-crested Cormorant, but as it got closer it looked like it might have been smaller than a cormorant. It was uniformly dark in the bright sun. As it came abreast of our boats, we both noticed a long, down-turned bill. We didn't notice any color on the face itself, but the bill looked paler in color than the head. I turned my kayak to get a better look and followed the bird with my binoculars until it was out of sight.

    Relative Size & Shape

    not as large as a Great Egret or a Great Blue Heron - the length of the body looked approximately the size of the Caspian Tern we'd been watching but the wing shape was very different (heavier, shorter, broader) - long body, long neck, fairly long tail that appeared to droop a little - flew with its neck stretched out straight

    Head

    We didn't notice any color variation for the whole bird (except for its lighter bill).

    Feet & Bill

    The decurved bill was long, maybe as much as three times as long as the head was wide.

    Upper Back

    We didn't notice any color variation for the whole bird (except for its lighter bill).

    Lower Back & Rump

    We didn't notice any color variation for the whole bird (except for its lighter bill).

    Wings

    We didn't notice any color variation for the whole bird (except for its lighter bill). Wings were heron-ish: broad from leading edge to trailing edge, bent at elbow.

    Breast, Belly, Flanks, Under Tail Coverts

    We didn't notice any color variation for the whole bird (except for its lighter bill).

    Tail

    relatively stubby tail that appeared to droop a little

    IMPORTANT: What similar species were eliminated when making the identification and how was this bird different?

    We first thought cormorant, but this bird appeared a bit smaller. As soon as the bird came abreast of us and we saw the bill, we were confident it was an ibis. I didn't even think of a vagrant White-faced Ibis, a species I've seen only out west.

    This report was written from notes taken:Written from Memory

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