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The Invisible Boundaries of Sierra de Bahoruco National Park

The Invisible Boundaries of Sierra de Bahoruco National Park

Recently, journalists and photographers used a new generation drone that gave them impressive bird’s-eye view of the same sites they visited on foot two years ago when they first exposed the deforestation happening within the national park.

A Big Birding Year in Windsor County

A Big Birding Year in Windsor County

As part of the annual Vermont County Birding Quest, Windsor County, Vermont birders made history in 2014, putting up record numbers that may never again be matched.

Are Chickadee Nests the Key to an Effective Bumble Bee Nest Box?

Are Chickadee Nests the Key to an Effective Bumble Bee Nest Box?

Given that no effective bumble bee nest box exists in North America this is a call to action to flesh out the possibilities of this technique. You can help!

Over 1,000 New Ocean Fish Species

Over 1,000 New Ocean Fish Species

Over 1,000 new-to-science marine fish species have been described since 2008 – an average of more than 10 per month – according to scientists completing a consolidated inventory of all known ocean life.

February Photo-observation of the Month

February Photo-observation of the Month

Congratulations to Joshua Lincoln for winning the iNaturalist Vermont February photo-observation of the month contest.

A Field Guide to March

A Field Guide to March

On Friday, March 20th at 6:45 PM spring arrives in the north. While the sun may be predictable, March weather is not.

Ghosts from the Arctic

Ghosts from the Arctic

Like ghosts from the Arctic, snowy owls have descended from the far north this winter. They’re showing up in fields, along highways and even in a few backyards.

Bad Landing, Good Person

Bad Landing, Good Person

A lady from Michigan called to say she thought she had a loon land in her field and she put it in a box after chasing it down. But it wasn’t a loon…

Friday the 13th Brings Good Luck on Puerto Rico

Friday the 13th Brings Good Luck on Puerto Rico

Nearly a month into VCE’s Bicknell’s Thrush field surveys on Puerto Rico, our quarry has finally revealed itself. On February 13, VCE field technician Julio Salgado was birding the stunted elfin forest that cloaks Cerro de Punta, the island’s highest peak at 4,390 feet (1,338 meters) elevation. He had just finished marking and georeferencing five points on sampling block #6719, in preparation for the next morning’s dawn census. Ever hopeful of finding an elusive thrush, Julio walked along the small service road that winds to the summit, playbacks bursting from his handheld speaker at 50-meter intervals. He had a feeling.

Counting Vermont's Crows

Counting Vermont’s Crows

Vermont has two species of crows, and one is very scarce and tricky to identify with certainty. Fish Crows are near their northern limits in Vermont. An extremely small breeding population is well known in the Burlington area. Nesting has been located only four times, the latest in 2012. Well confirmed observations of birds are mostly one or two birds at a time; rarely three or four individuals have been well identified during an observation. The 2012 nesting had two adults and three juveniles, for an unusually high count of five.

Outdoor Radio: Exploring Life Above and Below the Ice

Outdoor Radio: Exploring Life Above and Below the Ice

Nordic skating, pond hockey, small planes landing and ice fishing – there’s a lot happening on Lake Morey’s ice.This month on Outdoor Radio, VCE biologists Sara Zahendra and Kent McFarland skate out and talked about life in the cold water below with some ice fisherman far out on the lake.

‘Nature’s Medicine Cabinet’ Helps Bumble Bees Reduce Disease Load

‘Nature’s Medicine Cabinet’ Helps Bumble Bees Reduce Disease Load

Researchers studying the interaction between plants, pollinators and parasites report that in recent experiments, bees infected with a common intestinal parasite had reduced parasite levels in their guts after seven days if the bees also consumed natural toxins present in plant nectar.

iNaturalist Vermont January Photo-observation of the Month

iNaturalist Vermont January Photo-observation of the Month

Congratulations to iNaturalist Vermont user “rebelgirl73” for winning the January photo-observation of the month. Her image of a Red Fox (Vulpes vulpes)…

A Field Guide to February

A Field Guide to February

On February 5, wildlife and the rest of us here in New England crossed a threshold – arbitrary yet not insignificant: 10 hours of daylight. You can sense it when you head out in the morning: Black-capped Chickadees, Northern Cardinals and European Starlings are among birds breaking out into song. Even though we’ve got lots more winter, we’ve also got change. So here’s a Field Guide to February.

Historical Bird Data Going Digital

Historical Bird Data Going Digital

For nearly 30 years, Vermont bird watchers dutifully sent in their sightings each season to the Records of Vermont Birds. All of the original paper records were archived in boxes for the historical record. The 30 years of data undoubtedly hold many conservation and scientific discoveries, but the lack of a computer database for retrieval of these data has proven to be a roadblock to examining them.

Angels Trump Bicknell’s

Angels Trump Bicknell’s

Four days of scrambling up and down wet forested slopes on Puerto Rico. Nasal, piercing calls of Bicknell’s Thrush emanating from my small, handheld speaker. Ears on high alert for at least a muted response. Many miles logged from the western mountains of Maricao to the eastern ridges of Carite State Forest. No Bicknell’s Thrush, not yet anyway, but… angels appeared.

Outdoor Radio: Exploring the Trees On Vermont's Highest Peak

Outdoor Radio: Exploring the Trees On Vermont’s Highest Peak

When you’re on a ski lift or hiking up one of Vermont’s mountains see if you can spot the different forest types while you climb up the mountainside. Outdoor Radio hosts Sara Zahendra and Kent McFarland recently rode the gondola at Stowe Mountain Resort to check out the trees on Vermont’s highest peak, Mount Mansfield. Join them on their trip and learn about mountain trees.

Off to the Races with Vermont eBird

Off to the Races with Vermont eBird

Just about everyone who enters their bird data on Vermont eBird, a project of the Vermont Atlas of Life, is no doubt aware that some species can be identified in the field to recognizable races, Red-shafted and Yellow-shafted flickers or Eastern and Western Palm warblers are well-known examples. Although some species can be easily separated into races (but by no means all of them! Some are quite tricky.), many observers do not record their birds down to race when possible. But we really should when we can. Here’s why…

Among the Machetes

Among the Machetes

The world’s largest machete collection and Bicknell’s Thrush might seem to share little in common. However, the evening of January 18 saw VCE kick off our project to survey Bicknell’s Thrush across Puerto Rico, amidst the planet’s reputedly greatest assemblage of these age-old cutting tools.

Finding New Vermont Birding Hotspots Near You

Finding New Vermont Birding Hotspots Near You

Discover the best places for birding nearby or around the world using the Vermont eBird hotspot explorer. You can explore Vermont eBird hotspots in a map-based tool designed to provide quick access to all the information you need. Thanks to suggestions from Vermont eBirders, we have recently added numerous Vermont eBird hotspots for the main ridge and high peaks of the Green Mountains from Mt. Mansfield to Middlebury Gap.

Vermont Common Loons: The Limits of Success?

Vermont Common Loons: The Limits of Success?

One of Vermont’s greatest wildlife conservation triumphs is the return of the Common Loon. From a mere seven pairs three decades ago, Vermont’s loon population has steadily climbed to 84 pairs in 2014. But in recent years, something unusual has been happening among Vermont loons.

Champions Crowned for 4th Annual Vermont County eBird Quest

Champions Crowned for 4th Annual Vermont County eBird Quest

From the predawn hoot of a Great Horned Owl on January 1st to a Hoary Redpoll at a feeder during the waning days of 2014, hundreds of Vermont birders scoured fields and fens, mountains and meadows, lakes and lawns to discover as many species as possible during a single calendar year. The 4th annual Vermont County eBird Quest pitted county versus county, birder against birder — all engaged in a friendly rivalry for top birding honors.

The 2015 Christmas Bird Count Roundup

The 2015 Christmas Bird Count Roundup

As we all know, Christmas Bird Counts aren’t necessarily about finding rare birds. But all those birders out during the count period are bound to discover new and unusual birds. So here’s a summary, in no particular order, of what was hot during the 115th Vermont Christmas Bird Count season.

A Field Guide to January

A Field Guide to January

Although the days are slowly growing longer, life in the Northeast now finds itself in the coldest depths of winter. January is about survival. Wildlife that doesn’t migrate adapts instead in order to make it to spring.

Jason Hill Joins VCE as Post-Doctoral Research Biologist

Jason Hill Joins VCE as Post-Doctoral Research Biologist

With the new year, VCE welcomes post-doc Jason Hill, who has relocated from State College, PA to launch our 3-year, nationwide project studying the migration ecology of Upland Sandpipers and Grasshopper Sparrows.

Vermont Fish & Wildlife Publishes Landowner’s Habitat Management Guide

Vermont Fish & Wildlife Publishes Landowner’s Habitat Management Guide

The Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department is announcing the release of the long-awaited book entitled A Landowner’s Guide – Wildlife Habitat Management for Lands in Vermont. The book is a comprehensive guide to wildlife habitat management on private lands. It is filled with colorful photos and helpful tips.

November Photo-observation of the Month Winner

November Photo-observation of the Month Winner

Congratulations to Joshua Lincoln for winning the November iNaturalist Vermont photo-observation of the month.

Happy New Year (and Give It Up for a Gray Jay?)

Happy New Year (and Give It Up for a Gray Jay?)

From all of us at VCE, have a great 2015 with wildlife. We’re looking forward to another productive year uniting people and science for conservation.

Ice-bound Loons

Ice-bound Loons

With the early cold weather, some loons simply fail to leave in time and get stuck in ice on small ponds. Usually these loons are chicks of the year (juveniles) that have to figure out migration on their own. The parents likely left in October or early November.

Owl Eats Owl

Owl Eats Owl

I was on my way to an event at the school gym here in Strafford, Vermont the other evening when I was called over by a bunch of kids who said they found an owl that they thought was sick or hurt because it was perched on a picnic table and didn’t fly away when it was approached. What I found surprised me!